Tag Archives: Commonwealth Games

Looking forward to the Commonwealth Games

noo noo girl running for David

As we look forward to the Commonwealth Games, and wonder about the legacy the games will leave behind, my mind drifts back to how devastating it felt when the London Olympics were finally over….

Life, it suddenly seems, has become dull and devoid of anticipation; the Olympics and Paralympics are over. I watched as much of both games as humanly possible, around summer outings, children, and work. Every night, once children were in bed, I was in a sport-induced heaven. Watching the sportsmen and women strive for, achieve, or maybe just miss, lifetime goals was inspirational. But did you notice how the Paralympians reacted differently to the Olympians? So many athletes crossed the line to a silver, and immediately seemed disappointed and unhappy with their performance. Silver or bronze didn’t seem a high enough achievement; the gold medal was all that mattered. However, the Paralympians openly rejoiced in the opportunity of completing; they savoured each medal with such joy, they congratulated their opponents with genuine happiness (despite their own disappointment), often competing the lap of honour together; only the heptathletes and decathletes display a similar solidarity. They received their medals with immense gratitude and thanks. In short, they were often very contrasting sportsmen and women to the Olympians. I can’t wait until when, in the future, more of these Paralympians cross over into able-bodied athletics as they will not only inspire future generations of able and non-able bodied athletes to believe that anything is possible, but their humble approach to their sports may bring a different dimension to modern day athletics. I can’t imagine any Paralympian behaving like Usain Bolt or Yohan Blake, or refusing to complete unless the price tag is sufficient.

Surely we have all got a lesson to learn from the blossoming of the modern Paralympics on the global stage.When I turn up to my club sessions, I am always thankful and relieved just to have made it on time, with adequate kit. When I race, I have learnt to feel grateful for the experience regardless of the result, even though deep down I would like to run so much better. So many other women, and men, in my club seem to be constantly chasing a PB, or chastising themselves for inadequate performances, missing out on just being present, and seeing that just taking part is the real achievement.

During the summer I was lucky enough to compete in a mixed team event for my club in a local off-road relay, and, despite our team being slower than most others, each one of us gave 120 per cent. Our captain supported us enthusiastically and did a fantastic job of organising us both prior to the race and the day. We couldn’t compete, and came seventh, but we were all so happy to have done the event together. Not coming first was not on our radar; enjoying the day and doing our best was what we individually strived for. Overall times and positions seemed irrelevant at the end. Having a drink together and praising each other, and seeing each other happy was much more rewarding than any PB I have achieved (not that I have done many yet!). This day will definitely be remembered as a highlight of my summer.

Watching the Paralympians gave me greater perspective regarding how lucky I am to get out running, even though I am always overstretched, and how much I appreciate my other club members and their support, friendship and camaraderie. There are many people who don’t have the luxury of running, and would give anything to be able to run, however tired or busy they are. So as we leave behind an amazing summer of sport, and head into the winter, I am going to keep focused on what I achieve in the less clement months of the year, rather that what I don’t. Running, or running well makes me happy, but being part of a team, or with club members, leaves a much deeper sense of fulfilment.