Book review: Your Pace or Mine?

Running is, of course, a metaphor for life. Just like the build up to Christmas, it’s often the anticipation of an event that brings the most joy. You’re busy for months doing your training (Christmas shopping), getting your kit ready (hanging up the sparkly lights and putting up your tree) and buying your race day nutrition (turkey, sprouts and extra thick double cream). Race day can often be quite painful, but it’s how we push ourselves as we work towards this day where we reap greatest personal benefits. Sometimes we get injured and other times races just don’t go to plan. Then we have to forget times and instead focus on finishing.

Lisa Jackson has just run her 100th marathon, in itself an awesome accomplishment by any runner. However, when you read Lisa’s latest book, Your Pace or Mine? what you take away most is Lisa’s sense of fun and adventure. This is the most important part of Lisa’s marathon journeys.

Buy it now! Before copies run out!

Buy it now! Before copies run out!

She isn’t in this running game in a quest for a list of impressive PBs. Lisa is on a journey through life that is driven by the need to connect with other human beings. Running is just the method she chooses to do this. Lisa is trying to tell us something quite simple, and something those runners who punish the ground, with heads down, probably miss. It’s not about the time you do, but the time you have along the way.

If you run a lot of marathons you’re going to meet a lot of wonderful (crazy) people and Lisa shares her extraordinary stories with great humour. The personal stories could be yours or mine.

The amazing Lisa, bringing a little bit of magic to the London Marathon Expo last week

The amazing Lisa, bringing a little bit of magic to the London Marathon Expo last week

We all want to be as fast as we can but if being fast takes away the fun there’s little point to running. I love the way Lisa tackles running and races, in that she believes you don’t have to punish yourself to be a true winner. The chapter where Lisa shares with us losing her mum and auntie really spoke to me; it’s so touching and thought provoking. Her feelings are an echo of all our losses.

You don’t have to be fast to have fun with running. Lisa shows us this, and her spirit shines through every page. We all need to find some time to chill with this book and just enjoy the stories and adventures, then ditch our Garmins and go for a relaxed run – hopefully with someone special who brings a smile to our face. If this book inspires you to do this, then I know it  would make Lisa proud.

You can buy Lisa’s book here

Let me know what you think!